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Posted by on Jun 27, 2017 in Know Your Skin | 0 comments

Battling with Eczema

Battling with Eczema

Eczema can be one of the most frustrating skin conditions out there.  I have watched clients suffer with this treatment for years.  While no true cure for it exists, the more we can be informed of what causes this disease and how it works, the more likely we are to prevent flare-ups.

Hypothesized Causes:

-hereditary factors (a close relative has it)

-environmental factors such as smoke, pollen, and pet dander

-certain foods can trigger eczema such as dairy and nuts

-stress

-sweating (from excessive heat or humidity)

-irritants on contact such as laundry detergents, soaps, shampoos

Long list, right?  The problem for those dealing with eczema is that many things can be a trigger for this skin condition.  So, how can we better manage the systems and avoid skin irritation?  Here are some tips to help prevent the symptoms of eczema:

-avoid contact with known irritants to your skin

-focus on using skincare products that maintain your skin’s lipid barrier (moisturizers, balms)

-receive monthly facial treatments to soothe irritation and boost hydration and moisture in the skin

-get tested at your physician’s office to see if there are any foods you should avoid that may be causing flare-ups

-make an appointment to see your dermatologist for any prescribed topical or oral medications to alleviate eczema symptons

Although exfoliation needs to be handled with the utmost care, I find many clients suffering with eczema have an excessive amount of dead skin buildup.  The dead skin can cause further itching and irritation and also prevent their products from absorbing deeper into the skin. Using gentle exfoliation techniques like removing your facial cleanser with a warm washcloth can help get rid of dry and dead skin.

Since eczema can cause the skin to feel itchy, the urge to scratch can be really strong.  I often advise clients to keep their nails cut short, because bacteria can hide underneath the nail bed.  If they are inclined to scratch their skin (which we want to avoid), shorter nails may discourage the spread of bacteria.

As always, check with your physician for clarity on what is best for your skin condition and needs.  Eczema can be a battle, but the more informed you can be, the better you can be at fighting the symptoms 🙂

 

 

Priya Crumpton (42 Posts)

Priya Crumpton is the founder of Sweet Life Skincare based out of Roswell, GA. Her goal is to help people rediscover and enhance their natural beauty through education, inspiration, and hope.


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